Film Analysis

Transcendental Style (cont’d)

If you are curious about this subject, please view my previous introduction and video essay to Transcendental style in film. My journey to understanding transcendental style began a few years ago, when I became fascinated with Richard Linkater’s films and the idleness of his storytelling. The meandering quality of Slacker’s cinematography felt like a meandering eye – a soul – me. It was around this time that I was introduced

Film Review: RBG

Ruth lost her mother, Celia Ginsberg, at age seventeen. However, she never stopped following her mother’s advice: “Always be a lady and always be independent.” 68 years later, Ruth Bader Ginsberg is still fighting for sex equality. Those words carried Ruth through Harvard Law, where she met her husband Mitch. Mitch is characterized as a loud, gregarious type; the complete counter to Ruth’s stoic, no-small-talk presence. Throughout Ruth’s career, Mitch

Valentine // Blue Valentine Chronologically

A recut version of Derek Cianfrance’s Blue Valentine, excluding the present “blue” scenes, leaving only the love-filled flashbacks. I loved the inter-cut storytelling in Blue Valentine, but I often wondered if the origin story would stand as strongly on its own, as it does within the context of the full film. At any rate, it was a lil experiment that I thought some folks may find interest in.

Introduction to Transcendental Style

Just as mystical experiences are nurtured through emptying the mind, transcendent cinema is born through emptying the frame. As I reflect back on the last few years, transcendental style is at the forefront of my mind. Whether I knew it or not, transcendental style has dominated my thoughts and had a significant influence on my own personal filmmaking. I would like to write about the topic more and ideally tie

The Influence of Bazin’s Ontology of Film on Richard Linklater

Context: This essay has dominated my thoughts over the last few months. I began thinking about this topic long before Northeastern, and even Gordon. Incredibly inspired by the video essay by Kogonada (which I highly suggest anyone watch), I got turned on to Linklater and a whole new way of watching and appreciating cinema. I really tried to make this essay accessible by giving more context to some of the films

Dream is Destiny

Context: Richard Linklater is currently my favorite director. He tells stories about what he knows- a bunch of white guys hanging out in Texas. Beyond the surface level masculinity and stoner art house film vibes, there is an incredibly serious man, telling incredibly important stories using the medium of cinema. Quiet stories about the present moment, the passage of time, and the experience of dream. This essay served as the

Star Wars and the Success of Manipulated Genre

Context: Here is another academic essay. Star Wars is pretty beat to death, but it’s still fairly fun to write about. One correction of sorts would be the fact that Star Wars is heavily influenced by the space opera genre. While this is true, I still believe that the Western holds some serious weight as well. George Lucas’ Star Wars (1977) walks the traditional line of a Hollywood science fiction

Donnie Darko, Jesus Christ, and Religion in the 80s

Context: This is an essay I wrote for a film analysis class, as such, tone is very formal.  Movies are much more fun than they sound in an academic essay. None the less, Donnie Darko is a neat film, and it was great to combine my interests of cinema and religious studies. The cinematic experience is inherently dreamlike. How many times have you walked out of a movie theater in